Tulip

Tulip: The showy colors and velvet texture resemble a turban. The term comes through the obsolete French word “tulipan” from “tulbend”. The latter was the Turkish way of sayin...

Phlox

Phlox: It has flowers with variegated colors, which glow like flames. In Greek, “Phlox” means “flame.”

Pansy

Pansy: Someone thought the flower looked like it had a thoughtful face, hence “pensee” in French, which means “thoughtful”. This was later turned into pansy. When you hear the...

Hydrangea

Hydrangea: It has showy flowers, and a seed capsule shaped like a cup/miniature water vessel. The name comes from the Greek words “hydr” (water) and angos (seed/capsule), so it suits a fl...

Columbine

  Columbine: The blue, purple, white, pink, and yellow inverted blossoms look like a cluster of five doves. Therefore, the word comes through the classical Latin “columba”, meaning &...

10 Hot New Wedding Trends for 2015!

By: Lauren Kays for the Knot We don’t have a crystal ball but we do have our pulse on what’s hot in the world of weddings. From Wild West weddings on the ranch to bridal jumpsuits and GoPro wedding v...

Geranium

Geranium: The seed pod looks like the bill of a crane, so the name comes from the Greek “geranos”/crane. A popular variety is “pelargonium”; in Greek “pelargos” me...

Marigold

Marigold: This was named after Mary and the color gold. It was once used for healing wounds. Formerly, it was also used as a flavor for stews and making soap. The botanical name “calendula̶...

Lilac

Lilac: The word means “blue.” The origin of the name is from the Persian “nilak” (bluish) which passed into Arabic as “laylak.” In the 16th century, the plant was ...

Iris

Iris: This plant has sword shaped leaves. The varied and vibrant colors of the large flowers are named for Iris, the Greek goddess of the rainbow. In France, it is called the “fleur-de-lis̶...