A Smithsonian Horticulturist Goes on a Quest for an Historic Seedling

A live oak tree from a South Georgia island community will one day enhance the grounds of the African American History Museum.

Seven miles off the coast of Georgia is a remote and wildly pristine barrier island accessible only by ferry. . . . and special invitation. The island of Sapelo is a rugged and mysterious paradise. A relatively unchanged landscape and untouched natural wonderland, the island’s sweetgrass marshes mingle with sweet-smelling sea air and its dunes and beaches are made iridescent by metallic sands.

Sapelo’s alligator-filled creeks and imposing forests of bladed palmetto, dense thickets of yaupon holly (Ilex vomitoria), tall slash pine (Pinus elliottii), and immensely humbling live oaks (Quercus virginiana) shrouded in Spanish moss are sign posts of Mother Nature’s dominion over this island…[READ MORE]

Source: A Smithsonian Horticulturist Goes on a Quest for an Historic Seedling

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